2020 releases that I really should have gotten to

I am sure I am not the only one who had a weird year. My reading certainly mirrored that. I read less books (between living in a literal global pandemic and having a child, my focus just wasn’t there) and I also read nearly exclusively on my kindle – which means that I did not get to the books I pre-ordered. When I wrote my wrap-up post for my most anticipated 2020 releases it became obvious just how many books I did not get to, added to this are the books that came out during the second half of the year that I really wanted to read but didn’t. I am limiting myself here to books I already own (or nearly own) as I do want to try and actually get to these soon rather than buying even more books that I then not read.

Real Life by Brandon Taylor
Maybe the one I am most upset at myself for not reading – I am sure I will love this once I finally get to it. Everything about this Booker shortlisted book appeals to me, people whose taste aligns with my adored this, and what I have read of Taylor’s writing, I loved.

Utopia Avenue by David Mitchell
Mitchell is one of my very favourite authors whose books I have been rationing to not be without any to read, so obviously I pre-ordered it even thought that meant getting the weird huge paperback size that UK publishing insists on. Its huge size is also the reason I didn’t read this – I rarely have two hands free long enough to pick up a book.

Black Sun (Between Earth and Sky) by Rebecca Roanhorse
Another of my favourite writers, my most anticipated release of the second half of the year, another huge book that I somehow did not pick up. I love Roanhorse’s writing and I am very excited to see what she does in a mor epic fantasy setting.

The Death of Vivik Oji by Akwaeke Emezi
I adored Emezi’s debut and was over the moon when I managed to snag a Netgalley ARC for this – and then somehow didn’t get to it. I am slightly mad at myself for not reading this yet (the reviews I’ve seen from people I trust are all very positive) and want to remedy this as soon as possible.

Days of Distraction by Alexandra Chang
My colleagues got me a copy of this book when I went on maternity leave and I have been excited about it since – but I rarely read hardback books as I said, so I haven’t been able to pick this up. It sounds absolutely incredible though and I want to prioritize it sooner rather than later.

Piranesi by Susanna Clarke
I adored Jonathan Strange & Mr Norrell and had been waiting for another novel by Susanna Clarke for what feels like ages – and then never got around to buying this. My brother got me this for Christmas (I think, we haven’t actually seen each other since) and I am very excited. Everybody seems to really love this and I am hoping I will too.

Have you read any of these books and want to shout at me for not getting to them yet? Do you have any 2020 releases you cannot believe you haven’t gotten to?

Have I read my most anticipated releases of 2020?

Every year I round up my reading – amongst other things I look if I have gotten around to the books I was most excited about. To be fair, mostly I only read about half of the books I mentioned in my various lists (you can find my post from last year here)- and let’s see if I even did that this year. I only posted one list of books this year (here) because the second half got away from me.

Topics of Conversation by Miranda Popkey: I did not read this one because the early reviews were kind of atrocious – and especially because Rachel did not like this (review) and we often agree on this kind of book.

The Island Child by Molly Aitken: I also did not get to this one – even though I got an ARC. I was just never in the mood for this. I really should remedy that.

Verge by Lidia Yuknavitch: I read but didn’t love this. This is probably my most disappointing read of the year because I was looking forward to a collection of short stories by one of my favourite authors for a while.

The Illness Lesson by Clare Beams: I DNFed this – I just did not get on with this one at all and other reviews (mostly Rachel’s again) convinced me that this would not change.

Daughter from the Dark by Marina & Sergey Dyachenko: I cannot believe I did not get to this yet – I adored the other book by the Dyachenko that was translated into English so much. I really need to by this one soon.

And I Do Not Forgive You: Stories and Other Revenges by Amber Sparks: I read and enjoyed this. I don’t think Sparks can even write a short story collection that I would not like.

The Unspoken Name (The Serpent Gates #1) by A. K. Larkwood: I loved this; my favourite epic fantasy novel of the year.

So We Can Glow: Stories by Leesa Cross-Smith: I am upset I did not get to this because I am still convinced I would love it.

The City We Became by N. K. Jemisin: This is the main victim of my weird reading year. I started this the moment it arrived, having pre-ordered it ages ago, and then somehow did not manage to finish it. I have been reading this for months – something about it hits a bit too close and it is also my least favourite of her books so far. I am determined to finish it before the year ends though!

Wow, No Thank You by Samantha Irby: Loved it, will read everything Samantha Irby ever writes.

Godshot by Chelsea Bieker: Another victim of my only reading e-books; the cover is so stunning I would want to own a paperback copy.

Utopia Avenue by David Mitchell: I own a copy, but haven’t read this.

I Hold A Wolf by the Ears by Laura van den Berg: Read and loved it. Made me want to read every short story collection Laura van den Berg has ever written.

Most anticipated books of the first half of 2020

There will be so many incredible sounding books released next year that I have been thinking about this post for weeks. As usual, I will for now concentrate on the first half of the year and hopefully write another post some time around June when more books will have been announced. I have tried to no go totally over-board and only include books I am sure I want to get to. You can find more books on my radar on my Goodreads.

I will mostly focus on books that aren’t part of ongoing series but there are plenty of those I am excited about; for example: Headliners (London Celebrities #5) by Lucy Parker, Dirty Martini Running Club #2 by Claire Kingsley, Shorefall (Founder #2) by Robert Jackson Bennett, Alpha Night (Psy-Changeling Trinity #4) by Nalini Singh (hands down my most anticipated release of the entire year).

Topics of Conversation by Miranda Popkey (Knopf/ January 7th, 2020)

45754997Miranda Popkey’s first novel is about desire, disgust, motherhood, loneliness, art, pain, feminism, anger, envy, guilt–written in language that sizzles with intelligence and eroticism. The novel is composed almost exclusively of conversations between women–the stories they tell each other, and the stories they tell themselves, about shame and love, infidelity and self-sabotage–and careens through twenty years in the life of an unnamed narrator hungry for experience and bent on upending her life. Edgy, wry, shot through with rage and despair, Topics of Conversation introduces an audacious and immensely gifted new novelist.

Everything about that blurb appeals to me – that it has been praised as similar to Sally Rooney alone would have been enough to make me excited though. Continue reading “Most anticipated books of the first half of 2020”

My Favourite Authors

Instead of writing all the reviews I still have to write, I found this tag on Jennifer’s channel Insert Literary Pun Here and could not stop thinking about it. The tag, created by Steve Donoghue, works like this: you name six authors that aren’t quite your favourite, four authors that maybe are your favourite and then you rank your five favourite authors.

This was pretty hard; as always, I find it easier to name my favourite author, singular, than naming my favourite authors, plural (I have the same issue with favourite book vs. favourite books, favourite movie vs. favourite movies): naming more than one makes me want to definite criteria. What makes an author a favourite? Can somebody be a favourite if I have only read one book? Can an author whose books I haven’t read in years still be considered a favourite? But it was fun thinking about this and even if I am sure that the list would be completely different had I done it half a year ago and will surely change in the coming years (at least I would hope so, I am eternally looking for new favourite authors), I want to have this post on my blog to be able to look back to it.

Not Quite

Ilona Andrews

There is something safe and wonderful about Ilona Andrews’ writing. I haven’t read everything the duo has written (this will become a running theme here) but I adored, adored the Kate Daniels’ series and the first trilogy in their Hidden Legacy series got me through a particularly grueling time last year. They will always have a soft spot in my heart. The books are snarky, the banter between the love interests is brilliant (and I ship them more than is healthy), and the world building is excellent. In a genre I often struggle with, these books are a definite highlight for me.

Robert Jackson Bennett 

Again, I haven’t read everything he has written but his The Divine Cities trilogy is one of my all time favourite series. I am also super excited to see where he is taking his current series next (the second book will be published early 2020). I love what he has to say about fate and gods and the interaction between these two things. His characterizations are brilliant and his language sharp.

Maggie Nelson

Maggie Nelson is just so very clever. She is arguably currently the best at what she does: creative non-fiction that centers herself unashamedly while combining it with social and gender theory. I adore the way her mind works and her books are always a joy to read. I haven’t read her poetry and don’t plan on doing so, but I will surely read everything else she ever publishes.

Neil Gaiman

This is an odd one – because Gaiman started out in my favourites pile until I filled the spots in and realized he isn’t quite there for me anymore and then I kept bumping him lower and lower. I love his writing and I have read nearly every book he has published – but somehow his writing doesn’t feel like a favourite for me anymore.

Amber Sparks

She is my absolute favourite short story writer and I cannot wait to read her new collection next year – but for some reason or other I cannot think of her as a favourite writer. She’s brilliant on twitter though and I want more people to read her work, so if you like short stories with a speculative slant, you really should check her out!

Katherine Arden

The Winternight trilogy has a special spot in my heart: it is the first series I completely read as review copies before each book released. My most successful review on Goodreads is for one of her books I haven’t read yet and all I said was “I would read Katherine Arden’s shopping list if she published it” (I am not at all bemused by that fact and not at all bitter that this is the review that gets noticed when I put so much more effort into others I have written). Her writing feels custom-made for me: lush language with an immersive world-building, set in Russia in its endless winter, combining fairy tales with original stories, with a love story that work for me in a way it should not have. I really hope she’ll publish another adult book soon – although I will eventually pick up her middle grade.

Maybe

Nalini Singh

I adore Singh’s writing – but the whole is greater than its parts. I have read nearly every book in the Psy-Changeling series, plus the novellas, and while not every book worked for me, overall I find her world incredible. The world-building is impeccable and exciting, her characters are recognizable over long stretches of time, and I love her approach to romance. It is a shame her worldbuilding is not discussed more often in the fantasy community, as it really is brilliant, but I guess that is part of writing romance. I love her though and am currently making my way through her backlist (which is thankfully extensive!).

Lauren Groff

Groff feels like a favourite author without her books being absolute favourites of mine. I really like the way her language flows and find her prose so very soothing in the best possible way. Her short stories are brilliant but I also adored Fates and Furies which is pretentious in the best possible way. I own her other two novels but for some reason never pick them up. I really need to change that.

Melissa Broder

Even if she only ever wrote one book, The Pisces would be strong enough for her to feature on this list. It was my absolute favourite book of last year and my favourite to win this year’s Women’s Prize (I am sad it didn’t even make the short list). Lucy is such an endlessly compelling character and Broder’s observations and the way she describes the awful normality of sadness really resonated with me. Her memoir was not quite as strong but a really interesting framework for her novel. I cannot WAIT for her next book – my expectations could not be higher.

David Mitchell

My favourite male author, hands down. I adore David Mitchell’s writing. He is so good at conjuring awful characters and making them feel real in an instant. His command of narrative voice is incredibly impressive and his novels that are often closer to collections of very interconnected short stories, stay with me long after I finish them. I have two of his books left on my shelves and I am saving them for a figuratively rainy day. I was informed today that his new novel is coming out next summer and I could NOT be more excited.

Favourites

5) Sally Rooney

The newest addition to this list, Sally Rooney blew me away with her debut Conversations With Friends when I read it earlier this year. There was never any doubt in my mind that her book would top my best of the year list, it spoke to me so deeply. I loved everything about it, from her sharp language, to her flawed but sympathetic main character, to the way she made me feel for Nick, to her wonderful way with dialogue. Everything about the book just worked for me. Her second novel Normal People is brilliant but I am unsure if anything can ever top Conversations With Friends for me.

4) Roxane Gay

Roxane Gay’s writing works best for me in short stories. I don’t even think she is capable of writing a bad story. Her essays are brilliant as well and her non fiction regularly rips my heart out. I haven’t read her novel because I am scared it will scar me, but I follow what she does online very closely. She is an incredibly editor who chooses incredible voices and manages to make them even better, I think. She is such a hero.

3) Lidia Yuknavitch

The Chronology of Water is my alltime favourite non fiction book. Yuknavitch forever defined what I think of as possible in memoirs. The book is, on a sentence-by-sentence basis, incredible. Her turn of phrases are so sharp, so raw, so honest, they cut me to the bone. Her prose is definitely her biggest strength for me, but her way of connecting the real with the fictional (as done so in The Small Backs of Children) is a close second. Again, I need to read her other books but I am also scared to get to the end of her work and to have to wait. She will publish a collection of short stories later this year and I am ecstatic to get to read those.

2) Christa Wolf

I have read nowhere near her complete works, but Kassandra is, as most of you will know, my favourite book of all time. I also really loved Medea and Kindheitsmuster and I am planning on eventually reading everything she has ever written. She should have won the Nobel Prize for Literature but it wasn’t meant to be. Her writing still is incredible and I wish more people would read her.

1) N. K. Jemisin

Like I said, Favourite Author is easy for me: N. K. Jemisin is the best. I adore her brand of socially critical fantasy, I love the way she writes her characters, I adore her on twitter and in speeches, I think The Fifth Season is the best fantasy book written, possibly ever, I adore what she does with perspective and framing, and I think she deserves all the acolades she gets. She isn’t only an outstanding fantasy author, she is outstanding, full stop. I still haven’t read her collection of short stories nor her first duology but that does not detract from the fact how very brilliant I think she is.

Who are your favourite authors? How do you define who makes that list and who doesn’t? Do you find the singular or the plural easier to decide?

TBR: The last three month of the year (a male author selection)

I will only be reading books written by women and non-binary people next year. It seemed like a good idea when I decided on that a few months ago. My reading taste leans towards books written by women anyways and I got so annoyed at the articles proclaiming that men don’t read women – and being the good economist I am, I decided to show the market that I can do that as well – I mean being a woman and only reading women.

There are a few books that I am fairly hyped about that I won’t get to next year, but I figure waiting a few months before I read them won’t kill me. But, and this is the idea behind this post, I own a few books written by men that I do want to get to before the beginning of the year. So I will try to read them in the next few months (I have not been following any TBRs whatsoever, so we will have to wait and see whether I actually do read them). Here are some books I am excited about, in no particular order.

Kings of the Wyld by Nicholas Eames

Children of Time by Adrian Tchaikovsky

Acceptance by Jeff VanderMeer

The Heart’s Invisible Furies by John Boyne

Don’t Call Us Dead by Danez Smith

A Lucky Man by Jamel Brinkley

Reservoir 13 by Jon McGregor

number9dream by David Mitchell

Please get me excited about these books because they are all books I am sure I will enjoy (probably love) but some of them have been on my shelves for over a year. And if I don’t pick them up in the next three months, they will gather dust on my TBR shelf for longer still.

Tag: How I Choose My Books

I was tagged (a while ago, sorry) by Hadeer over @ Cairene Librarian for this absolutely wonderful tag. Thank you so much!

Find a book on your shelves with a blue pink cover. What made you pick up the  book in the first place?

The first book with a pink cover I found on my shelves is Cloud Atlas by David Mitchell, one of my favourite authors. I bought this because I enjoyed The Bone Clocks enough to feel like he is somebody I want to read more of – and that book I chose because the cover just spoke to me in a book shop (and it sounded JUST like my type of book). I am in general a huge fan of the way Mitchell’s books look. Continue reading “Tag: How I Choose My Books”

Recommendations: Books told differently

I keep saying that I like books that are told in an unconventional manner or unchronologically or just plain differently. This is the thing that link most of my favourite books. So it seems only necessary to recommend some of those books in the hope that you might like some as well and so that you can tell me about your favourite books that might be a bit different.

Ghostwritten by David Mitchell

23574514I adore everything I have read by David Mitchell. His characterisations are brilliant, his tone is pitch-perfect, and his way of loosely structuring his books just works extremely well for me. Most of his books are told in intersecting short stories and even more so, all his books allude to each other in one way or another – and ugh, I love that.

Ghostwritten might be my favourite of his – even though I also admire Cloud Atlas beyond everything. Mitchell is just a genius.

Kassandra by Christa Wolf

4412083Christa Wolf is possibly my favourite author – and Kassandra is definitely my favourite book of all times. I don’t even have the words to describe how much this books means to me. Told in stream of consciousness during the last few hours of Kassandra’s life, this book goes forward and backward in time in just the perfect way. Every sentence, every word is pitch-perfect.

The Zsar of Love and Techno by Anthony Marra

29236311Anthony Marra should really get to writing more books because I have five-starred both books he has written so far and I don’t think I have done that with any other author. He has a way with words that makes me speechless and he is able to make characters of every single person in his books, often with just a sentence in a half. This book is (again) in the form of intersecting short stories that span years and genres and it is just absolutely breathtaking and sad. You really should read it if you haven’t already.

A Visit from the Goon Squad by Jennifer Egan

9549746Again, a book told in short stories that span genres and feelings, this book made me so very happy while reading it. It very deservedly won the Pulitzer Prize and shows how different styles can be used without feeling gimmicky. Also, I do love pretentious books, so this was right up my alley. I was less impressed with Egan’s newest book, so I in no rush to read the rest of her oeuvre, but this one is really something.

Fates and Furies by Lauren Groff

24612118I am a big fan of Lauren Groff’s writing in general (I am slowly making my way through everything she has ever written), but this book in particular was just made for me. Written first from the perspective of Lotto (often employing his horribly pretentious plays to do so), Groff than changes everything we know by telling the same (but very different) story from his wife’s (Mathilde) perspective. And I LOVED this. This book is just the right amount of indulgent and pretentious for me.

Have you read any of these? What were your thoughts? Do you have any recommendations for me based on these books?

Try A Chapter – May 2018 or books I have been excited about for too long.

I am not really doing all that well on my resolution to read the books that I owned before the start of the year. So I figured, I would pick a few books off my shelves and read the first chapter to see which one I want to read. I have seen this tag around and always wanted to try it.

I chose mostly fiction because I am currently reading a whole lot of genre fiction and need to diversify again. I also picked books that I am in theory super excited about, mostly by authors whose work I have enjoyed before. I am for some reason not that good to actually pick up a favourite author’s other works.

Book 1: number9dream by David Mitchell (on my shelf for 1 1/2 years)

975186Why I own it: Because I love David Mitchell and want to read all his books; this is one of two of his novels I haven’t read.

Thoughts after one chapter: That was a long chapter that should have been annoying: mixing dream sequences with Michtell’s trademark unpleasant young men does not sound appealing. But somehow it is and by the end of these 40 pages I a) want to know more and b) feel really sorry for Eiji.

Book 2: The Clocks In This House All Tell Different Times by Xan Brooks (on my shelf for 6 months)

32869842Why I own it: It was nominated for the Costa First Novel Award and I love that title.

Thoughts after one chapter: I don’t know. I found it clumsy in its foreshadowing and maybe a bit too vague (and I do enjoy vagueness in my fiction). This does not quite grab me yet.

 

Book 3: An Untamed State by Roxane Gay (on my shelf for 1 1/2 years)

26029800Why I own it: It’s Roxane Gay.

Thoughts after one chapter: That book starts with a bang. I am not sure I can deal with this much darkness at the moment but on the other hand I love the way Roxane Gay’s language flows.

 

 

Book 4: Arcadia by Lauren Groff (on my shelf for over 1 1/2 years)

30621334Why I own it: I loved Fates and Furies when I read it a few years ago and bought this one and then never got around to reading it. Story of my life. I did recently read her new short story collection Florida and enjoyed that as well, so now I really want to read everything Lauren Groff has written.

Thoughts after one chapter: Very interesting. I love Lauren Groff’s straightforward prose and I do want to see where this goes. (This does not have chapters, so I read 15 pages.)

Book 5: The Book Of Joan by Lidia Yuknavitch (on my shelf for 6 months)

30653706Why I own it: I am a huge fan of Lidia Yukanvitch’s writing (her memoir was by far my favourite book of last year) and want to read everything she has ever written. And then I don’t read her books.

Thoughts after one chapter: I love this. Lidia Yuknavitch is a hero. This first chapter gives a dizzying insight into the book to come and I am so here for this weird dystopian tale.

 

So, yes, this was a success. I am excited for all these books (except maybe the Xan Brooks which is just straight up weird and somehow not hooking me at all). I will be reading the David Mitchell first and then Lidia Yuknavitch’s book (second only because I am currently already reading a few sci-fi-ish books).

Have your read any of these books? What were your thoughts? Which one would you have chosen?

Friday Favourites: Author Edition #1

I like talking about the things I like (who doesn’t, I guess), so I will be trying to post about my favourite book related things regularly (I will aim for every second friday but I’ll have to wait and see if I can manage that). I will talk about my favourite authors and why they rule, about my favourite genres and why they make me happy, my favourite books and why they stick with me. And so on and so forth. There are so many things I love about books, I am sure I will be able to go on for a while. So without further ado, here’s this week’s thing I love:

David Mitchell6538289

I adore the way he crafts his stories: he plays with time and space and convention; he mixes genres and voices and he is undeniably brilliant. I adore the way he writes unpleasant characters and makes me care for them anyway.

One of the reasons I adore him so is how he plays with time lines: my favourite of his books are more connected short stories than “normal” novels; he tells his stories unchronologically but all the more beautifully (I adore this way of telling stories).

I have not yet all of his books but here are the ones of his I have read plus a mini-mini-review for each.

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The Bone Clocks:

This was the first of his books I have read and while I didn’t love love it, it was enough to go out of my way to pick up his other books. This book is stronger in the beginning where his brilliant way of creating characters shines; he manages to infuse even the side characters with enough personality to make them real (often with a sentence and a half that paints such a vivid picture). The ending got a bit out there with the war between different factions of immortals but this is still a book I loved.

4 out of 5 stars

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Cloud Atlas

His most famous book was the one I fell in love with. After finishing this, with the biggest smile on my face if I might add, I just knew I had to read every single one of his books. I had actually seen the movie before reading this and enjoyed that but this book is just beyond brilliant. It is definitely in my top 10 favourite books of all time and I cannot imagine it ever losing a spot on that. Again, his characters are brilliant, the way this novel is structured is astonishing, the way he plays with language makes me happy and I just loved this.

5 out of 5 stars (obviously)

23574514

Ghostwritten

David Mitchel’s debut novel is already brilliant. Here he first uses the format he perfected for Cloud Atlas and it works absolutely brilliant as well. I think it was with this book that I started to really notice the connections between his books and that added to my love for both this book and for his body of work in general.

5 out of 5 stars

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Black Swan Green

This novel is the most conventional of Mitchell’s novels; it is partly autobiographical and shows the struggles of a teenage boy: with his stutter, with finding a place in the world, with his relationship to his family. While it is a good book, for me it does not come close to the genius of the books I read before. But I have seen people name this as their favourite of Mitchell’s novels, so I guess it comes down to genre preference. And I usually prefer genre fiction with literary aspects to coming of age stories.

3 out of 5 stars

30840877

Slade House

This creepy little novella is a companion novel to The Bone Clocks and I adored this. Again, I found parts of the eternal war between immortals overdone but the first three stories in this horror novel were unsettling, beautiful, and memorable. My review for it is here.

4 out of 5 stars

There are two of his books I have not read yet:

975186

number9dream

This is one of the five potential five star reads I picked last month so I am hoping to get to this soon.

25927038

The Thousand Autumns of Jacob de Zoet

This one I have started before but somehow was not in the mood for historical fiction (it is a genre I frequently struggle with but sometimes really really love), even if it is historical fiction written by David Mitchell. I will definitely come back to this at some point, obviously.

Have you read any of David Mitchell’s books? What did you think?

 

5 star prediction tag

Mercedes over at my favourite booktube channel MercysBookishMusings recently did a thing where she predicted five books she thought she would adore so much she would give them five stars; later she then had a look at how that went. I think this is a brilliant idea and I am eager to see if I am any good at predicting which books I will adore.  You’d think, having read as many books in my life a I have, that I’d have a pretty good grasp at what will be a five star read for me, however ever since I started writing reviews I have come to realize that this is often not the case (exhibit a, exhibit b).

Five star reads for me are a combination of many things:

  • vivid language,
  • brilliant characters,
  • innovative story telling,
  • emotional response (helpful but not necessary).

For this list I went through my Goodreads to read shelf and then went with how I felt. Let’s see how this approach pays off.

975186

number9dream – David Mitchell

At first glance this seems a sure in; it is David Mitchell doing what David Mitchell does best. I gave two of his books five stars and three four stars. He is one of my favourite authors. But on the other hand, some people I trust think this is by far his weakest work. But I do trust David Mitchell. So I guess, I’ll have to read and see.

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Human Acts – Han Kang

Again, I am going with a book by an author whose work I have previously enjoyed. The Vegetarian is one of my favourite books of the last few years and one with imagery that stayed with me. I have been waiting to be in the right mood for this because this seems like it’s very very grim.

33864360The Magic Toyshop – Angela Carter

This just seems like a book I will adore. I have been wanting to get to Angela Carter sooner rather than later. Everything I heard of her sounds just so brilliant and I don’t even know why I haven’t read anything of hers. The edition I own looks so beyond beautiful and just like a me-book.

28601847

 

Snow in May – Kseniya Melnik

Short stories? Short stories set in snowy locations? Interconnected, bleak short stories set in the snowy North of Russia? Sign me right up. This sounds so much up my alley it is a bit ridiculous. Also, every time I look up this book, I wonder why I have not already read it. Because, see above. How can I not love this?

36262478

 

The Sea Beast Takes a Lover: Stories – Michael Andreasen

First off, I love that title. Second: Bewitching and playful, with its feet only slightly tethered to the world we know, The Sea Beast Takes a Lover explores hope, love, and loss across a series of surreal landscapes and wild metamorphoses.” (From the blurb) Need I say more?

 

I will try and get to these books sooner rather than later – but I am a fickle reader and there is not telling if I will feel like reading any of them soon. Which is stupid now that I think about it.

Can you usually tell if a book will be a five star read for you? Also, you should all join in this prediction tag, so that I have somebody to laugh with when inevitably I am dead wrong about at least half these books.